Ancient History: Greece : War, Conflict, and Diplomatic Relationships

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Ancient History: Greece

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

The Delian League was founded around what year?

Possible Answers:

323 BCE

477 BCE

480 BCE

None of these

Correct answer:

477 BCE

Explanation:

Delian League was an alliance made up of about 150 Greek city-states. The League was founded after a meeting between the potential allies in 477 BCE. 480 BCE was recognizably not the correct answer, as that is the date of Xerxes razed Athens, an event that helped incentivize the development of the League. The Delian League's primary importance was that it consolidated naval power in the region.

Example Question #2 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

What was the nature of Athenian involvement in the Ionian Revolt?

Possible Answers:

A large naval force under the command of Miletus laid siege to key Persian ports in Ionia

A small force under the command of Miletus landed in Persians to help fight the Ionians

None of these

A small force under the command of Miletus landed in Ionia to help fight the Persians

Correct answer:

A small force under the command of Miletus landed in Ionia to help fight the Persians

Explanation:

Athenian involvement in the Ionian Revolt was relatively small, in terms of troop commitment, but firmly on the side of the Ionians. The garrison under the command of Miletus landed in Ionia, and was notably involved in the burning of Lydia.

Example Question #3 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

What was the end result of the Peloponnesian War?

Possible Answers:

Athens became the dominant force in the region

The war ended in a draw; neither side gained a true advantage

Sparta became the dominant force in the region

Corinth became the dominant force in the region

Correct answer:

Sparta became the dominant force in the region

Explanation:

The end of the Peloponnesian War ushered in a, rather ill fated, period of Spartan political dominance. As an elitist warrior society, the Spartans proved quite ill-suited to this role, and relied on military (particularly naval) dominance in order to maintain their status. Sparta's political structure eventually crumbled under the increased diplomatic and bureaucratic weight, leading to the fall of Sparta.

Example Question #4 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

Lysander is most often remembered for __________.

Possible Answers:

leading the Spartan defense against the Persian Empire at Thermopylae

leading Spartan forces to victory over the Athenians in the Peloponnesian War

his contributions to Pre-Socratic Philosophy

establishing an ancient Greek colony in North Africa, which would later develop into Carthage

his contributions to the development of Sophist philosophy

Correct answer:

leading Spartan forces to victory over the Athenians in the Peloponnesian War

Explanation:

Lysander was the most influential and notable Spartan admiral during the Peloponnesian War.  He led the Spartan forces to victory over the Athenian navy and soon thereafter forced the complete capitulation of the city of Athens.

Example Question #5 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

Themistocles is most famous for __________.

Possible Answers:

leading the Ionian Revolt

leading the Spartan navy during the Peloponnesian War

his contributions to Epicureanism

organizing the Spartan resistance at Thermopylae

leading the Athenian navy at the Battle of Salamis

Correct answer:

leading the Athenian navy at the Battle of Salamis

Explanation:

Themistocles was a renowned politician and general in Athens during the Athenian Golden Age. He was one of the most influential politicians during the Greco-Persian Wars. He is responsible for increasing the size of the Athenian navy and for leading the Athenian navy in the pivotal Battle of Salamis. It was due to his foresight and leadership that the Persian navy was defeated and Greece was preserved.

Example Question #6 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

The First Greco-Persian War broke out ___________.

Possible Answers:

after the Greek city-states in Asia Minor rebelled and joined the Persian Empire

after the forces of Sparta sacked several cities on the Persian coast

due to longstanding competition over trading rights in the Mediterranean

as a result of Athens lending their support to the Ionian Revolt

as a result of the declining influence of Athens and Sparta in the Aegean Sea

Correct answer:

as a result of Athens lending their support to the Ionian Revolt

Explanation:

The First Greco-Persian War broke out as a result of Athens lending their support to the Ionian Revolt. The Ionian Greeks had been conquered by the Persian Empire, much to the dismay of their fellow Greeks in Athens and elsewhere. When the Ionian Greeks revolted against their Persian masters, Athens (and other city-states) sent troops to help the rebellion. These troops contributed to the destruction of the Persian city of Sardis. This prompted the Persian Emperor, Darius I, to vow that he would conquer Greece and destroy Athens.

Example Question #7 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

The Peloponnesian War was fought between __________.

Possible Answers:

Athens and Macedonia

Macedonia and Sparta

Athens and Sparta

Athens and Persia

Greece and Persia

Correct answer:

Athens and Sparta

Explanation:

The Peloponnesian War was fought between Athens (and their allies) and Sparta (and their allies). It was fought from 431 - 404 BCE. The war ended in total defeat for the city-state of Athens and the loss of her empire. It also greatly weakened the Greek city-states in general, including Sparta, and ushered in the opportunity for the rise of Macedonia under Philip and Alexander the Great.

Example Question #8 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

The Battle of Marathon __________.

Possible Answers:

ended in the liberation of the Ionian Greeks from under the control of the Persian Empire

ended in victory for the Spartan navy and the end of the Peloponnesian War

ended in the subjugation of the Ionian Greeks by the forces of the Persian Empire

ended in victory for the Athenians and the end of the First Greco-Persian War

ended in victory for the Spartans and the end of the Second Greco-Persian War

Correct answer:

ended in victory for the Athenians and the end of the First Greco-Persian War

Explanation:

The Battle of Marathon was fought between the forces of Athens and the Persian Empire in 490 BCE. It was the decisive battle of the First Greco-Persian War and ended in victory for the Athenians. It brought to an end the first attempt by the Persian Empire to conquer the Greek mainland.

Example Question #9 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

Who was the Persian ruler during the Second Greco-Persian War?

Possible Answers:

Darius I

Cyrus the Great

Draco

Zoroaster

Xerxes

Correct answer:

Xerxes

Explanation:

The Persian Emperor during the Second Greco-Persian War was Xerxes. Xerxes led an invasion of the Greek mainland during the fifth century BCE. It is during this invasion that the famous Spartan stand at Thermopylae took place. The war ended with the complete destruction of the Persian fleet at the Battle of Salamis.

Example Question #10 : War, Conflict, And Diplomatic Relationships

The Delian League was led by __________.

Possible Answers:

Corinth

Sparta

Macedonia

Athens

Persia

Correct answer:

Athens

Explanation:

The Delian League was led by Athens. The Delian League was formed in 477 BCE, in the wake of the second Persian invasion of Greece. It was an organization of city-states, under the direction of Athens, who came together to provide for mutual protection against future Persian invasions. The league, however, quickly devolved into an expression of Athens’ personal power which led to many conflicts within the league. It also led to the rise of the Peloponnesian League, led by Sparta, and the outbreak of the devastating Peloponnesian War.

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